Welcome to the food intolerance network

The leading website for food intolerances and food allergies.

Fructose, Lactose & Histamine

gastro-restaurant

On this free to use website, you can find useful information about lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption, histamine intolerance, gluten intolerance or coeliac disease, and much more. The information provided is subject to stringent quality criteria.

Privacy Policy

dayne topkin 78982 unsplash privateWe are in full compliance with the European data protection laws.

Find the privacy policy and all info about how we handle your data here.

Advertising

Latest articles and blog entries:

How much fructose in an ...?

You can find out more about how to maintain a healthy diet even with fructose malabsorption in our article "A healthy diet despite fructose malabsorption".

Many vegetable varieties can be made more tolerable by cooking them thoroughly, pouring off the cooking water and rinsing the vegetables well. The fructose content can be reduced a little by doing this.

Some general information: How much fructose is in what foods?

The following is a limited list. You can find a more precise list of fructose levels in foods in our fructose table.

The following products generally have a lower fructose content and are normally tolerated well:

  • Wheat products
  • Milk products
  • vegetables: chickpeas, green peas, potatoes, spinach, chard, radish, Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, leaf salad, cucumber, prickly pears, avocado, rhubarb,...
  • fruits: tangerines, lemons, limes, prickley pears (often: Indian fig), bananas, coconut, ...
  • Nuts (except peanuts-> sorbitol!)
  • Meat, poultry, fish
  • Eggs
  • Water, coffee and herbal tea

You will find high levels of fructose, mannitol and sorbitol in the following products (not well tolerated):

  • Nearly all fruit varieties
  • All dry fruit varieties
  • Foods or beverages with "High Fructose Corn Syrup" (HFCS) or sugar
  • Fruit juices
  • Peanuts
  • Honey
  • Wine (sweet wine, cider)
  • Sodas (Softdrinks)
  • Button mushrooms
  • Shitake mushrooms
  • Black salsify
  • ...

You can find detailed lists with fructose levels in the download area and here in our list of foods.

If a corresponding molecule of glucose is available for every molecule of fructose, it is no problem for the digestion (see "Treatment of fructose malabsorption”), as long as you don't ingest too much fructose all at once! It thus all depends on the glucose-fructose ratio (after the fructose-restricted diet!) Note!: Glucose (dextrose) should never be eaten in large amounts or over a long period of time, because it will put a strain on the blood sugar levels and therefore also on the pancreas.

Sources include
Souci-Fachmann-Kraut, Lebensmitteltabelle für die Praxis, 3. Auflage
NMI-Portal
Kamp, A; Schäfer,Ch; "Gesund essen, Fruktosearm genießen" Gräfe und Unzer Verlag, 1. Auflage 2007

What we do and who we are

The food intolerance network is a charity that provides worldwide information about lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorption, histamine intolerance, FODMAP-diet and much more. Usage of this website is free of charge. We are funded by the "Society for Public Health" and advertisements that have no influence on the editorial content of our website. Please read our terms of use before you use our services.

We are a community!

On this website you can open a free account and interact with many others suffering from food intolerances. You can organize groups and events, can upload fotos, discuss, ask and answer others, you can add friends and much more. We are the leading community for people with food intolerances, food allergies or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Please register for free and be part of our discussion board (forum), thanks!

login

Remember Me
Forgot username  Forgot password

Advertising

Advertising

Certifications & Quality

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

quality criteria logoThe information provided is created in compliance with a self-imposed quality management procedure

Disclaimer

The information provided on the Food Intolerance Network website is no substitute for a visit to a registered dietician, nutritionist or a doctor. The information that you will find here may not be used as a substitute for professional advice and treatment by a medical professional or approved and registered dieticians. The content of the Food Intolerance Network website may not be used as a basis or means for any form of self-diagnosis.

Go to top